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New Technology May Change The Game Of Cricket

D
eveloped by former Australian Test fast bowler, Peter George, The MyCall No Ball Detector now allows live dashboard displays of bowler’s foot landing positions, and other data.

George developed the sensor-based system that detects no-ball deliveries, avoiding the need for game-delaying replays; as a result of his own frustrations as a bowler.

“This technology means umpires can focus on the batsman and not be distracted by having to watch the bowler’s foot in the delivery crease,” George said.

Last summer, controversy broke out after Pakistani bowler Naseem Shah bowled four no-balls, all of which were missed by on-field umpires, in one over.

Among the four was what would have been Shah’s first wicket for his country, a prize which was taken away by the third umpire upon review when it became evident that a no-ball was bowled.

The technology, which eliminates the question of no-balls, has already caught the attention of government funders and private investors, among them, former and current players.

More refinement is required before the system is ready to be implemented on the ground, the Sportstech Industries MyCall team is lead by George and his wife and business partner Suzy George.

Former CUA chief executive, Rob Goudswaard, has joined as the executive advisor to help start-up through to commercialisation.

Venture capital and innovation commercialisation expert, Mike Avey and robotics and technology developer Darren Foster will also join.

George said: “The export market opportunities available to Sportech are boundless.”

“As we ramp-up to full commercialisation, MyCall will target distribution to all playing levels, from grassroots club cricket to the international arena including competitions in the United Kingdom and India,” he said.

The company has recently released the first design of their MyCall lightweight electronic shoe tags; capable of including motion tracking and delivering heat maps of front foot landing locations and bowling data.