Ministry of Sport

2018/19 Sees The largest Investment Into Community Cricket Facilities In Queensland Cricket History 

Over $1.2 million has been invested into Queensland community cricket in the last 12 months, marking an 85 per cent year-on-year increase from 2017-18.

47 Queensland-based infrastructure projects with a total estimated value of $10.3 million received funding commitments in the past year, the largest investment into community cricket facilities in Queensland Cricket history.

Nationally, 240 cricket facility projects received over $5.5 million in funding as part of the Australian Cricket Infrastructure Fund (ACIF), a funding partnership between State Cricket Associations, Cricket Australia and the Australian Cricketers Association.

A comprehensive two-and-a-half-year audit of community cricket facilities in Queensland resulted in the curation of the Queensland Cricket Infrastructure Strategy 2018-2028 (QCIS).  

The outcome of the audit was a range of immediate, short- and medium-term priority projects aimed at improving community cricket facilities and providing greater experiences for grassroots participants, including lighting, field, training facility and construction works.

Queensland Cricket Acting Chief Executive Officer, Terry Svenson, said the work being done under the QCIS and ACIF will have a significant and long-lasting impact on cricket.

“Queensland Cricket’s purpose is to provide outstanding experiences for communities across the state, so ensuring our clubs and participants are playing on quality grounds and accessing better facilities remains our priority,” he said.

With female participation significantly increasing across Queensland, Redlands Cricket Club have recently completed a major infrastructure project to ensure their facilities are female and community-friendly.

Redlands received $50,000 as part of a $387,000 project to upgrade change rooms and sight screens, while also undergoing vital electrical, roofing and fencing works at their home ground.

“The past few years have seen a big uplift in the number of women and girls playing cricket, so we need to make sure our club venues and change rooms are at a standard where all players feel welcome and comfortable.

“The Australian Cricket Infrastructure Fund has been a game-changer in improving facilities for clubs, and we are already seeing the positive effect it is having, particularly in our regional communities.

“We need to pay special thanks to our clubs, associations, administrators and volunteers who have embraced the ACIF and Queensland Cricket Infrastructure Strategy and are working hard in helping us grow and improve cricket experiences for our next generation of players,” Mr. Svenson said.

19 more infrastructure projects have also received funding in the past year compared to 2017-18.

Shaun Carney

Shaun Carney